BSBLDR511 Develop and Use Emotional Intelligence

Introduction 

This unit covers the development and use of emotional intelligence to increase self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship management in the context of the workplace.

It includes identifying the impact of own emotions on others in the workplace, recognising and appreciating the emotional strengths and weaknesses of others, promoting the development of emotional intelligence in others and utilising emotional intelligence to maximise team outcomes.

It applies to managers who identify, analyse, synthesise and act on information from a range of sources and who deal with unpredictable problems. They use initiative and judgement to organise the work of self and others and plan, evaluate and co-ordinate the work of teams.

Emotional Intelligence 

Emotions are part of what makes us who we are. Emotions impact on the way we behave and the way we relate to others, so they affect both ourselves and those around us. Everyone interacts with others, in some form or another. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a set of skills and knowledge that helps us to perceive, understand and manage emotions in ourselves and others.

Emotional intelligence is an individual’s ability to recognise their own emotions and feelings, manage their own behaviour in response to these emotions and make balanced decisions in emotional situations. It is also an individual’s ability to recognise the emotions and feelings of others and interact with them in a way that manages their behaviour and relationships with others. It is the ability to recognise heightened emotions in both yourself and others around you, remove yourself from the stress and manage the situation objectively, taking into account the feelings of those involved, to arrive at a resolution agreeable to all involved.

 

“I don’t want to be at the mercy of my emotions. I want to use them, to enjoy them, and to dominate them.”

– Oscar Wilde 

Resources 

BSBLDR511 – Learner Guide

BSBLDR511 – Powerpoint

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Emotional Intelligence

Overview

Emotional Intelligence as a concept has been around since the early 20thCentury, however it was Daniel Golman’s book on Emotional Intelligence in 1995 based on the work of Mayer and Salvoley  that really brought Emotional Intelligence into the spotlight.

Everyone has emotions.

Emotions are part of what makes us who we are. Emotions impact on the way we behave and the way we relate to others, so they affect both ourselves and those around us. Everyone interacts with others, in some form or another. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a set of skills and knowledge that helps us to perceive, understand and manage emotions in ourselves and others.

Emotional intelligence is an individual’s ability to recognise their own emotions and feelings, manage their own behaviour in response to these emotions and make balanced decisions in emotional situations.

It is also an individual’s ability to recognise the emotions and feelings of others and interact with them in a way that manages their behaviour and relationships with others. It is the ability to recognise heightened emotions in both yourself and others around you, remove yourself from the stress and manage the situation objectively, taking into account the feelings of those involved, to arrive at a resolution agreeable to all involved.

Emotional Intelligence (EI) incorporates two key  parts:

  • Personal Intelligence:being intelligent in picking up what is going on inside us and doing what we need to do about it. Intrapersonal intelligence is what we need for effective self-
  • Interpersonal Intelligence:being intelligent in picking up what is going on in other people and between people and doing what we need to do about it. Interpersonal intelligence is what we need for effective relationship management, which as social beings we need both in life as a whole and at work.

In practical terms, this means being aware that emotions can drive our behaviour and impact people (positively and negatively), and learning how to manage those emotions – both our own and others – especially when we are under pressure.

Emotional Intelligence is not so much the ability to do something as ‘the practice of integrating feeling and thinking, of using thinking about feeling (and feeling about thinking) to guide behaviour’. Most of us have the ability to do this to a significant extent, but often we don’t. Our decision to not use our emotional intelligence stems from underlying beliefs we have, or fears, or habits of behaving in ways which ignore feeling.

The good news is that, unlike IQ, Emotional Intelligence can be developed and improved as we become more aware and so learn to manage our own emotions and those of others.

Emotional Intelligence focuses on the importance of attitudes for long-term change. It is considered that attitudes are formed and developed in the limbic brain, which learns mainly through emotional experience

Unit Resources

A – BSBLDR511 – Learner Guide V1

Videos

Daniel Goleman Introduces Emotional Intelligence

TedX Talk Developing Your Emotional Intelligence Ramona Hacker

Emotional Mastery – the Gift of Unpleasant Feelings

Self Control 

People Currency – Practicing Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Laws are the key to better relationships

References

Genos Emotional Intelligence Model , genosinstitute.com